Hayek versus Keynes...In Verse

Michael Ashton - 01/28/10

Central Bank Dilemma: Choosing The Stable Parameter

Michael Ashton - 01/05/10

Shelter Flatters CPI Print

Michael Ashton - 12/16/09

Another Saturday Night

Michael Ashton - 12/03/09

You Don't Say?

Michael Ashton - 11/25/09

Today's Data Is Not What The Fed Wants To See

Michael Ashton - 11/18/09

 

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Hayek versus Keynes...In Verse

by Michael Ashton on January 28, 2010

We rarely post anything with no additional comment, but this link to a terrific video comparing Keynes' theories to Hayek's is terrific. Read more »

Central Bank Dilemma: Choosing The Stable Parameter

by Michael Ashton on January 5, 2010

A recent opinion paper out of the St. Louis Fed argues that the Fed ought to "hierarchically" stabilize inflation first and then turn to growth. But the author's argument is incompletely formed, and in fact is probably a better argument for an ad hoc approach, or alternately a laissez faire approach! Read more »

Shelter Flatters CPI Print

by Michael Ashton on December 16, 2009

The unwind of the housing bubble is masking the underlying trend of percolating inflation. Read more »

Another Saturday Night

by Michael Ashton on December 3, 2009

Thirty years ago, Volcker's "Saturday Night Special" announcement kicked off a monetarist experiment that permitted the Fed's direct assault on inflation. Maybe it is time to try it again. Read more »

You Don't Say?

by Michael Ashton on November 25, 2009

The Fed suspects that if rates are kept very low for a long time, it is possible that such policy could lead to excessive risk-taking in financial markets. Really. Read more »

Today's Data Is Not What The Fed Wants To See

by Michael Ashton on November 18, 2009

A small upside surprise in CPI could have been a bigger one without the housing-bubble unwind; this, combined with plummeting Housing Starts, is a bad set of data for the Fed. Read more »